Author: Mira Gonzalez

Mira Gonzalez has a conversation with
Andrew Duncan Worthington

My friend Andrew Duncan Worthington mailed me an advanced review copy of his first novel ‘Walls’ on May 11th, 2014, along with a $5 check to pay me back for a gin and tonic I bought him when I was visiting New York the previous month. He asked me for a blurb to put on the back of the book. I obliged after reading the novel and enjoying it, but then I realized that writing blurbs is a terrifying nightmare and I suddenly felt completely incapable of writing one. Anyways, here are the blurbs I ended up writing:

If you feel positively about even one of these things: sex, drugs, happiness, the laughter of small children, bacon, cashmere, any disney movie, efforts to reverse global warming, adorable animals, then you will LOVE Walls by Andrew Duncan Worthington.

I once heard a story about Andrew Duncan Worthington secretly putting orange juice in guacamole because he thought it would taste good, but then the guacamole just tasted like orange juice and it was bad. He didn’t do anything like that with this book.

One time I bought Andrew Duncan Worthington a drink, then I moved across the country and he mailed me a $5 check to cover the cost of the drink, which was $8.

One time Andrew Duncan Worthington brought blood sausage to a rooftop barbecue and I ate it because I felt bad that nobody else was eating it.

Andrew Duncan Worthington looks a lot like Dermot Mulroney, who is an actor that I didn’t know about at all until someone told me Andrew Duncan Worthington looks like him.

An engrossing book and one that is often difficult to swallow, emotionally. Ultimately redemptive, uplifting, great characterization. Well done. -An Amazon customer review for Freedom by Jonathan Franzen

Ultimately, none of my blurbs were used to promote Andrew’s book. Which I think was a really smart decision on behalf of Andrew and/or his publisher.

After all my blurbs were rejected, I offered to interview Andrew instead. It took us ~1.5 months and 52 emails before we finally sat down and had a Gchat conversation. Which, by the way, has nothing to do with Andrew, who is very reliable. It is entirely due to me constantly forgetting to respond to his emails for multiple weeks.

The following is my conversation with Andrew Duncan Worthington, author of Walls, which is available now via Civil Coping Mechanisms.

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